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a big agreement -- a big agreement to try to address the deficit in this country and other issues. that is what we want. that is what the president of the united states wants. but what the speaker of the house said in the same breath is you cannot close loopholes -- corporate loopholes in the tax "-- tax code. you cannot get rid of the loopholes that reward companies for shipping jobs overseas. that you cannot ask the oil and gas companies to no longer take taxpayer subsidies. that is what he said. every bipartisan group that has looked at this issue -- simpson bowles and every other group -- say you need a balanced approach to get something done. that is what the president wants to do. in the same breath to say you want to get a big comprehensive plan and at the same time say you want to protect special interests loopholes in the tax code is, i believe, irresponsible. what is their answer that will bring before the house? the plan to end the medicare guarantee. sentencing is they have to go to the higher insurance market where they will have to pay more. i was just and with this
going to do a big thing. it was going to be a big surprise. they get hundreds of thousands of these every week. they have a strong following. every year to a takeover youtube with people taking over youtube about what is awesome in the world. youtube has partnered with them. it has been amazing. it has increased awareness for all of these organizations. to speak to his birthday, on his birthday last year, johnson, hank, you are 30. i realize you do not like many things. you do not like stuff. i did not know what to get you. but then i remembered you like oxygen. for your 30th birthday, we have planted 20,000 trees in your name. then he showed a 10 minute video of people in iraq, all over the united states, almost every continent except antarctica. this beautiful music of people planting trees with signs a said happy birthday, hank. we work with them in the aftermath of the earthquake in haiti. we worked with all of these different people. we reached out to everyone we possibly new including j.k. rowling who sent us seven harry potter bucks. we reached out to the actors in t
to have big shots in the economy, you need to discourage debt and encourage equity including big banks and small banks. >> thank you for being part of this historic hearing. this comes at an historic time for the nation. we received letters from more than 400 ceo's about the pending potential of the fault -- of default on the nation's debt. they said that even a technical -- technical default in this case would have catastrophic events. this happened in 1979 even under the well and tens of congress for it was late resulting in interest rates that plague the country for the next 10 years. given what is happening around the globe, with moody's downgrading ireland again today, what is your advice to the congress in terms of acting and giving the deadlines that secretary of the treasury tim geithner has outlined? >> my advice would be simple and be the same advice as christie and the lifeguard would give the united states. you need to expend the debt ceiling and you cannot play games with something this serious. world financial markets are much more fragile than you would like to believe.
sure the motion gets scored and that could be a big pickup in this whole process. that allows things to die. >> that will give them three days to hate it. >> you don't want to deal hanging out there so long because hit a pi like anata. you don't want rank-and-file members to feel like it was crammed down their throats striking that balance on the timing will be critical. >> the deadline to get some the to the floor is what to t? the house republicans announced they canceled one of their work. in their district. >> economists have told me that you will start to seek markets get a little spooked. by the end of next week or early the following week. that is something that will make it from both sides want to avoid. >> does that put more pressure on them? >> absolutely. >> in the week after, they will need a couple of days to debate it in the house and the senate could do it within hours if they have an agreement. if no one tries to filibuster, it will be fairly quick. they should probably start the debate by this week. >> thank you for being part of our program. [captioning performed by
companies are earning big money. we've got a real problem here. we want to do the right thing and we want to protect people. that is the end of may. i call on senator ihop. >> i want to thank you for holding this important hearing. you and your staff to put a great deal of time and effort into preparing the investigative report the committee released today. i also want to thank those at the federal and state levels who have pushed for the legal action. i want to recognize a former colleague, lisa madigan, the attorney general in illinois who i worked with. she has been active in this field and i welcome heard here this morning. for more than a decade, new hampshire has had a primer for responding to a practice known as cramming. when i served as the state's top law enforcement officer, and oversaw an active protection -- consumer protection bureau which include the publication of consumer protection source book and brochures to provide individuals with information how to protect against cramming. in new hampshire, the public utilities commission is authorized to find service providers and
. there was money to be had and project. there was the big exciting new they embraced it heartily. as gil said we also had an emerging commercial space market. it is something that has been on the horizon with the carter administration. it was embraced in the reagan administration. by the time we arrived there was $5 billion a year of commercial beginning to get complicated. space business and it was rules of the road, with the proper role of the government is and how to interact with other countries, what we expected and what is the role of government services? utilization of commercial contributor. so that was clearly a large so all those things were the word gets complicated vision of where we get space policy and space needs. as we said before we had a national space council. the president was interested in the area of it and so he was more than happy to have one. we had rate relations and is each one of these guys will tell you, the chemistry inside the white house makes a big and how it is done. difference on what can be done there is internal wrangling for a variety of reasons, things get
of our site. president obama has given us a mission to focus again on the big picture of exploration, the crucial research and development required for us to move beyond where we are. we have the mission to carry out something that will take us further than we have ever been. he has asked us to plan a mission to an asteroid. our spacecraft is approaching one of the biggest in the solar system. we are scuttled to drop into orbit around that asteroid later this month. did the president is asking us to harness that american spirit of innovation, the drive to solve problems with capabilities that are so embedded in our moon. that led us to the loa that american ingenuity is alive and well. it will help us win the future. but only if we put aside ever differences and come together to work hard, dream big, and imagine in the possibilities. the space shuttle is an amazing vehicle. an incredible program that has taught us many things to make tomorrow's expiration possible. every shuttle mission showcases the amazing talent and expertise of of our astronauts in robotics and a science. each mi
institutional behavior from the big multinational corporations and others trying to deprecate as much as they can to make americans believe that the jury system is not a part of their legacy but instead a drag on the a economy and a place where runaway jury is entertained frivolous lawsuits. every american who hears the word "jury" and has the phrase "runaway jury" jump in their mind, every american who hears the word "lawsuit" and has a word "frivolous lawsuit" jump in their mind, has been the subject of indoctrination about this and of public communication. it is happening out there and i think when the supreme court is making decisions that are consistent with that long standing practice and pattern, it is worth our attention and i applaud the chairmen for holding this hearing. anybody who wishes to add information to the hearing has a week before we close it could without anything further, we will be adjourned. thank you all very much. i appreciate it. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> every saturday
and in the blue outline we have this very hard rock. we don't know how this is formed. it's a big mystery to us but it looks very special and it's one of the thing that is goes along. then we can drive out and go out to where it says clays, which is one of the types of minerals. and that patch of green there is a place that we would study. then we go up into where it says sullfathes another kind of a hydrated mineral and then we work our way up the mound. so we're exploring a jee logical environment that consists of a stack of layers. so let me skip to the next one. why do these layers matter? well, this is the history of geological exploration on earth and 150 years ago when explorers discovered the grand canyon they discord these layers of rock. if you start at the bottom of the pile of layers and go to the top, it's like reading a novel and we think that's going to be a great novel about the evolution of mars that offers strong prospects potentially for the discovery of habittable environments and maybe even a shot at potentially discovering organic compounds. but even if we don't find those
acres, 60 below zero in the winter. big bears. big salmon. i came back at superintendent as mount ranier. i had hawaii, guam and the sierras. i was asked to come back and serve as the 18th director. i went through senate confirmation and have been back here since. >> earlier this year, there was three hikers in yosemite that went through a waterfall and presumed to be dead. what the park system doing to keep them safe? guest: the experience was very tragic. i hate to hear about those things. in our job, we are to inform the public to protect themselves from these hazards. it's really not our job to fence off the hazards of the national park. part of that is part of the experience. to see wild america, at least as much that we can create. in the case of the myrtle falls incident, there is a barrier and signs. unfortunately, these individuals crossed those, entered the water, slipped and went over the falls. it's incredibly tragic. we will renew our efforts to warn the public about these thing. yosemite this time of year would have very, very low water flows. because of all the snow, we go
and illinois because those are kind of the big jackpot states that are really driving each party's potential for gain. and then i have a question mark as far as which party's going to gape or lose a site, it could be a fair fight in states like iowa, new jersey and arizona. but i'm sure the five states we'll be talking a lot about this morning and i'll stop short from going in-depth on them are illinois, north carolina, which are both parties' opportunities for partisan capitalization on this redistricting, illinois for democrats, picking up, you know, potentially five or six seats, or four or five seats, republicans losing five or six in illinois, north carolina where i put republican gains at possibly three seats depending on the legal challenge to the map that republicans are proposing, and then california, where i think democrats, at the end of the day, will probably pick up two or three seats as a result of the untangling of california's uncompetitive lines at the moment. texas, where, you know, i expect it to either be a draw or republicans netting two seats depending on the legal chal
of the big things. after a decade of racking up deficits and debt, we need to get our fiscal house in order. in order to do that, both sides are gonna have to step outside of the comfort zone and make some political sacrifice. we agree we cannot afford to default on our national obligations for the first time in history. we need to uphold the faith in credit of the united states. with the recovery that is still fragile and not producing the jobs we need, the last thing we can afford is the usual partisan game playing. congress will be any stronger position to focus on some of the measures i have party proposed by putting people to work rebuilding america's infrastructure or ipad system so that are innovators have a greater incentive to make new products. or making college more affordable. businesses that may be holding back, we'll have a greater confidence to invest and create jobs. i know we can do this. we can meet our fiscal challenge. that is what the american people sent us here to do. they did not send guard -- us to kick the problems down the road. they sent us here to work together.
-- drudge report to." -- report." he reports on the big spending and hypocrisy of the left. one of his essays that gave me and my friends a weekend of celebrating was the perfectly executed release of the acorn videos. [applause] and in fact, andrew breitbart is so skilled at allowing the left that a leftist organization called media matters for america -- another boo? called "new yorker" magazine. the guy said this as if he was making a horrible accusation against andrew. he said, "andrew brietbart in gauges in daily twitter warfare against the left." [applause] to which andrew was like, "i sure do." and his following soared on twitter. at that point, media matters' was even angrier. they launched the brietbart blogging parody contest. you can imagine how much that added to his twitter following again. i do not know what andrew is going to talk about. but i think we are all in for a fun time. thank you. [applause] ["friday," rebecca black] >> that is right. and thank you. thank you. who wants to see the photo? who wants to see the codex -- p hoto? what a large, large, large room. oh m
the prospective of jobs. the sign behind me, "dream big," is appropriate as we begin to discuss these great optimists. they truly are the great optimists in america. what we will talk about today, what are survey has shown is that there is a lot of uncertainty out there. they're people believe the u.s. economy is on the wrong track. there are people who think there are policies that come out of washington and other places that are the wrong way to go. the one thing you'll hear from the people appear today, and the one thing we heard during the listening session, multiple sessions of the country and in every state, is that when you talk to small businesses and you talk to the people really living the american dream, they are optimistic about their future. it is a pleasure for me to moderate this panel and talk about what we have found as we work through a poll that is the second quarterly poll we have done here at the chamber. what i will do is introduce you to 3 panelist on the stage with me and began a discussion about it. first, i would like to introduce the president and ceo of the miser
would describe it as dire. and we have three really big problems. a spending problem, a debt problem, and the jobs problem. that is why we believe it is important to fundamentally fix our spending problem and our debt problem and to help get our economy moving again. >> when you talk about what will happen on sunday, if you anticipate saying we have a framework for something that you could present your conference at the democrats can present to their conference? >> there is no agreement in private or in public, and as the president said yesterday, that we are this far apart. it is not like there is some imminent deal about that happened. there are serious disagreements about how to do with this very serious problem. >> there been talk of a deal package of $4 trillion, $2.5 trillion. what should be the goal with the august 2 deadline? >> i have wanted all for this process to do what i have described as the big deal. it would fundamentally solve our spending problem and debt problem in the near to medium term. but at the end of the day, we have to have a build up again pass through the
are not seeing that, in because you mentioned, th of the big overhang of foreclosed homes, which are weighing on prices. it is a vicious circle. people do not want to buy because prices are falling. prices are falling because people do not want to buy. there are a number of things we are doing. we are keeping mortgage rates globe. -- low. this works to try to modify -- there is work to try to modify mortgages. i think it is worth looking at that area. one area where more work needs to be done is housing finance. we have not begun to clarify for the market out housing finance -- the market and the public housing finance -- how housing finance will be conducted in the future. mi her area i suggest he mighwe ght think about is the overhang of distressed houses. for example, fanny, freddie, and the bank's own about half a million homes right now, which are basically sitting there on the market and which are pressing down prices and reducing appraisals and making the housing market much weaker than it otherwise would be. that is another area to look at. there are various things that one could do t
. >> so things like use of petty cash -- that could be quite big sums of money or small -- at the moment you just record that the journalist gave it to somebody. >> yes, and i don't have direct knowledge of all of those arrangements. >> i was going to ask if payments could have been made to family members of those alleged to have been hacked and similar, but is it possible that other forms of remuneration can be used in your company apart from cash and bank transfers? i am talking of things like travelers checks, vouchers and things that can be redeemed for cash. >> i don't have knowledge of that. >> just looking at some of your corporate governance -- page 2 and page 4 of your own code -- it mentions directors, employees and officers of news corporation acting to the principles set forth, including consultants, agents, suppliers and business partners adhering to the standards. it says, "we may never ask a third party to perform any act that would violate these standards." can you tell me a little bit more, especially on the financial side, how you, as an organization, try and make that
education and before signing. they had no idea. guest: we sadly see a lot of that. there is a big push towards college access. we want people to be able to get to college if they want to, however we need to pay more attention to retention, making sure people can afford to stay in college wants to get there. all of those loans, they can some day pay off by putting their degree to work. there is an entrance and exit interview process in the federal student loan program, but if that is all of the literacy you are getting, you will probably have that rude awakening. this goes back to the idea of a partnership, financial institutions, educational institutions, and in the home helping to teach kids about money. host: financial literacy group did a survey for the university of arizona and as people are interested in finding out more, what is your website? guest: www.financialliteracygroup.com and we have a facebook page and we can answer your questions. host: dan iannicola, thank you for your time. 2012 white house coverage, we are taking an event in michigan. we will bring that to you and yo
the prime minister agree that in the past when the house of commons has been faced with big issues that they have a tendency for knee-jerk overreactions? would you agree that newspapers are a force for good in this country and we need criminality weeded out of the media but not impose on a free speech or prepress? >> my hon. friend is entirely right. we need to make sure as the house of commons, as the government, in the debate that we have to show an element of restraint in regulation of the media because there's always a danger that the pendulum will swing too far the other way and we threaten investigative journalism, a strong and independent media that can hold government to account. when we consider some of the scandals that have been uncovered, it is often the press that does this. it is absolutely vital to maintain their british tradition. >> rebekah brooks described the prime minister as a friend and neighbor. we heard about christmas walks and conversations. >> order. this is the moment in parliament where we have a free speech. this question will be heard. that is the end
not cover a big portion of it right now. of a thousand new border patrol agents that are coming into service this year, the vast majority are going into arizona. but it is also critical to note that there are other activities occurring. our partnerships for mexico, for example, working joint operations with our mexican partners, then in mexico and us on our side, over 60 of the state's law enforcement agents are now partners with us in an operation that incorporates other law enforcement agencies to ensure that we bring the greatest density of enforcement coverage in arizona. the national guard right now, we have 363 national guard troops on the drown the-ground. we have more, so it is a constant buildup of what we are doing in arizona. when we bring arizona under control, not if, we will do so as quickly as we can. something that i think critical here is the following -- this year because of a drop in activity levels that we have seen, we figure that we will end up in the year with apprehensions somewhere between 106,100 18,000. but as 106,000 --106,000 and 118,000. throughout the state of
old. what are your hopes for the future? >> there's a big future. there's a deep future. the one that want for. so that is the future where we are all able to freely communicate our hearts and dreams, share information about the world with each other and the historical record is an item that is completely sack sacrosanct. it would never be changed, never be modified, never be deleted, and that we will steer of course away from the victim of he who controls the purses present controls the past. so that is something that is my life long quest to do. and from that, justice flows because most of us have an instinct for justice and most of us are reasonably intelligent. and if we can communicate with each other, organize and not be op pressed and not know what's going on pretty much the rest falls out. in the short term, it is that my staff stop hasling me to tell me to go. >> >> i wish you all the bevs another even more beautiful mission. [applause] >> here is a look at our schedule for this afternoon. next, a discussion with legal scholars on the 2010-2011 supreme court term and wha
in a big way, reduce debt and make it sustainable. those are key criteria, but they're not the only ones. and the path that has been clearly opened by my predecessor, dominique strauss- kahn, to include such matters as employment, social affairs, peripheral components of the traditional economic look at the situation of a country, needs to be taken on board as well. i'm not suggesting that the fund should be turned into a specialized boutique on employment and best way to reduce unemployment. boutique on the employment and the best way to reduce the employment. we need to rely on other institutions that exist and the work that has been undertaken together needs to be pursued, the same together with the wto. so the comprehensiveness of the approach must be enhanced. because ultimately we should never lose sight of what we are about. the international monetary fund is here to serve and provide services to its 187 members with a view towhat? help restore stability where there isn't stability and there's plenty of that around. to help make sure the economies of the world work better to provi
. it is a mixture of big and small airports that go into the best practices in terms of what's appropriate for each airport. >> i have a lot of precedent in a limited amount of time. you're talking about baggage screening equipment. the airport i use the most is in corpus christi. we have american and continental, three regional jets, southwest with 737's. each airline has a screening machines staffed by two tsa agents. we bought three machines for the corpus christi airport. probably a fourth one, because delta used to be there. why could there not be just one? there are never that many people there. do we have any idea why we are spending multiple -- thata has a program they're trying to move toward, optimal solutions for each airport. they are trying to remove the stand-alone machines and use more efficient systems or even so-called in-line systems, which require less personnel to operate. i am not sure if that particular airport is on track to get that system. >> one of the things i hear consistently from my constituents -- try saying that three times fast -- is why don't we faller -- follow mo
. what is pro-big business is actually sometimes more fundamentally seen as pro-first amendment. >> i could just add a footnote to that. it is interesting that justice brier, i think it, brought this out to discuss the commercial speech issue. there are some cases in which businesses are winning and some of them as a strike me as corp. first amendment issues. citizens united is a core but first amendment speech for corporations issue. they do not seem to have much to do with the corporate governance for self expression when is someone trying to put together a lot of information about who is taking which prescription and which doctors are prescribing which so they can market their drugs more effectively. is it first amendment case, but it does not feel like one to me, or apparently justice breyer. >> the same justices that dissented, including the female justices, joined at scully of -- scalia's broad view on violent video games. they are not necessarily about how we organize ourselves either. >> they are the multi-billion dollar gaming industry. that is not the way that most people re
big banking sectors, the trade association, a government watchdog groups and consumer advocates across the country. i am pleased to report that out or initiatives on improving market reforms, supervising credit businesses and setting up a strong military service offices have received widespread support from those individuals across this country. in my written testimony, i describe in detail the steps to provide meaningful oversight and to make sure it remains accountable to congress and the american people. i appreciate the opportunity to discuss that oversight today. members of the committee, elijah cummings, thank you for alumnae to testify. we are preparing this agency to begin its various responsibilities in appreciate these important oversight roles of the committee and your efforts. >> i thank the gentle lady for her comments. i will now recognize myself or five minutes. i received from kim wallace in legislative affairs department, it rather interesting response to our document request -- one second. we will leave you with a copy of it. i think he works capri for you for the tre
of the big questions that we raised reight away with the pakistani government. what gives? they try to figure out the same thing. but, pakistan is a large country. it is one of their lessons learned right now in terms of what they need to do to make sure they are aware of what is happening. and there have been individuals in the past from al-qaeda dattht have used the area as a transit point. >> in the front row. >> brad just ask the first -- asekd the -- asked the first question that i had in mind. clearly, one of our preferred tools for dealing with al-qaeda and its militants is targeted killing. i understand that it is perfectly legal. in that sense, i have no problem with it. it strikes me how much we rely on that to include targeting some people who are american citizens. it is that problematic in the long run? not from a legal point of view, but from a reputation appointive you for what it may bring back -- reputation point of view, for what it may bring back to us from the way that we imagine ourselves? >> without speaking to any particular operational activities or abilities, let me a
for the automatic pull out clock, hostilities is in in big u.s. term that is to find nowhere in the statute. legislative history makes clear there was no agreed upon view of exactly what the term hostilities would encompass more as the standard ever been defined by any court or congress itself. from the start, legislators disagreed about the meaning of the term and the scope of the 60-day poll out rule and whether into -- a particular set of facts represents a still is for the purpose of the resolution. it has been returned -- determined less by the dictionary definition and then buy into a branch practice. as my testimony recounts and senator kerry has noted, there are various leaders of this congress who have indicated they do not believe that the u.s. military operations in libya amount to the kind of hostilities envisioned by the 60-day poll of provision. we believe that view is correct and confirmed by historical practice and the historical practice which i summarize in my testimony suggests that when u.s. forces engage in limited military mission that involves limited exposure for u.s
more to life somewhere else after all it was a great big world with lots of places to run to and if she had to die trying she had one little promise she was going to keep oh yeah all right take it easy baby make it last all night she was an american girl ♪ it was kind of cold that night she still owed alone on a balcony yes, she could hear the cars roll by out on 441 like waves crashing on the beach and for one desperate moment there he crept bk in her memory got its so painful when something that's so close is still so far out of reach oh yeah all right take it easy baby make it last all night she was an american girl ♪ ♪ ♪ >> let's win ts thing. >> amen, let's do it this time. it is going to happen. thank you. thank you so much. hello there. thank you so much. ♪ ♪ fluf ♪ ♪ >> tempo pawlenty outlined his public policy position at a speech for the council of foreign relations on tuesday. he criticized the obama relations. this is one hour. >> thank you for being here. i'm delighted to have a chance to show my views. there are challenges facing the united states of americ
2007. and the kind of numbers i'm looking for you to paint in the big picture along the lines of, you know, how much poppy is exported out of afghanistan and is that up or down in terms of the years? is there more cultivated throughout afghanistan? are we up and down in terms of those numbers? and obviously, the insurgency gets its dollars from this drug trade. and so, are the dollars that you estimate from them to carry out the insurgency, are they getting more money now or less? and just kind of looking at the big picture to give us a sense of how we're moving in terms of our successethere. if each of you could do that from your own perspective i think it might put those numbers in a little different light. >> well, thank you for the question, senator. from dea's perspective, you know, it's a couple of interesting thing that is we have seen over the years due to the -- i think the successes that we have realized, again, with my interagency partners, and of course, with the afghans. there's sort of a change in the drug paradigm now in afghanistan where years ago where you had the org
to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces aghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the coander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines andanbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a regional perspective on issues affecting the region in afghanistan. he will be the first marine to serve as the top commander in afghanistan. the number one priority will be implementing president obama's decision last week to accelerate the transition of security responsibility to afghan forces and start bringing the u.s. surged forces home. as all land by the president, 10,000 u.s. troops wilbe withdrawn by the en
of timetable to have an agreement on big issues like tax reforms, social security reform, medicare reform, markede reform. they're all necessary. they are inevitable if we're going to do these but to do them on the compressed time frame i think was just too ambitious. they need to turn to the task of getting the debt ceiling raised and go back to dealing with the underlying problem which is the size of the programs and the fact that they are leaving so much debt. host: how much of factor was entitlement programs and what led to the end? guest: well, i wasn't in the room so no one knows for sure but i think there reall is an imbalance in what i have heard between the time and attention spent on reforming entitlemts, white house pretty much adamant against changing their basic structure. theywon't survive in the current form so that's not gog to help versus the time and attention spent on raing taxes which in the end will not solve this problem. we can't tax our way out. so it was a mismatch and mr. boehner finally decided they need to try another approach. host: from your previous stafment
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